Other sources of funding

 

The Worcestershire and Dudley Historic Churches Trust can only provide modest grants, but if appropriate, your application will also be passed for consideration to the National Churches Trust – see below. In addition to your own parish fundraising efforts, you might wish to explore some of the other possible sources of funds.

A pdf copy of the information below, is available here

 SOURCES OF FUNDING

 Funding for Repairs

 ALLCHURCHES TRUST

www.allchurches.co.uk

 The object of the Trust is to promote the Christian religion. The majority of the Trust’s donations are used to support the dioceses and cathedrals of the Church of England. But the Trust has a general fund which responds to requests for financial assistance from Anglican churches, churches of other denominations and the Christian community. It supports appeals from churches for building and restoration projects, repair of church fabric, church community initiatives, religious charities, charities preserving the UK heritage and other charitable causes. Grants are made out of income derived from the Ecclesiastical Insurance Office plc.

 NATIONAL CHURCHES TRUST

www.nationalchurchestrust.org

The Trust offers the opportunity to apply for a limited number of grants towards structural repair projects. In 2011 it is likely that the Trust will concentrate on projects involving urgent repairs to roof and rainwater goods with estimated costs of at least 50,000 (including VAT and fees).

CHURCH CARE

www.churchcare.co.uk

This very useful Church of England website has sections on caring for your church building, your church’s contents and your church yard; it also has a section on developing church buildings. The Cathedral and Church Buildings Division of the C of E administers a number of grants schemes. These supportPCCs, Chapters and Friends groups in the conservation of churches, cathedrals and their historic contents. You can apply for grants for fabric repairs and historic furnishings and artworks. The website has some very useful information on how to go about fund-raising.

ENGLISH HERITAGE

www.english-heritage.org.uk/caring/places-of-worship

English Heritage champions our heritage and advises the government and others on a wide range of conservation issues. It also offers a repair grants scheme which it operates jointly with the Heritage Lottery Fund.

 THE HEADLEY TRUST

www.sfct.org.uk

 The Headley Trust is one of the Sainsbury family’s charitable trusts. Amongst other things it supports:

 Repair work to the fabric of Anglican cathedrals and large ecclesiastical buildings of exceptional architectural merit

 Fabric repair of medieval parish churches in sparsely populated and less prosperous villages

Individual grant to churches appear to be small. In 2008, under its “Parish Churches Programme”, the Trust gave away 165,500 to a total of 57 churches making an average grant worth 2,904.

 THE JILL FRANKLIN TRUST

www.jill-franklin-trust.org.uk

 The Jill Franklin Trust makes small grants (typically £500 - £1,000) towards the “restoration not ‘improvement’ [i.e. towards re-instating an historic feature or improving the condition of an existing historic feature] of churches of architectural importance (it stipulates that the church should have a half page entry in Pevsner’s Buildings of England series)”.  It also stipulates that the church should be open to visitors every day”.

 THE PILGRIM TRUST

www.thepilgrimtrust.org.uk

 The Pilgrim Trust exists to preserve the heritage of the UK. However it does not fund directly projects seeking to develop new facilities within a church or the re-ordering of churches or places of worship for wider community use; it makes annual block grants to the organisations such as the Church Buildings Council, the National Churches Trust who do fund this type work. It will fund the conservation of important historic artefacts for example, wall paintings.  The trust favours projects where they believe it is difficult to raise funds from other sources and it wishes to see access or knowledge increased as a result of its funding. The trust has a small grants fund which is reserved for requests of 5,000 or less. Applications to this fund normally require less detailed assessment (though a visit or meeting may be required) but applicants should include the names of two referees from organisations with whom they work.

 TUDOR TRUST

http://www.tudortrust.org.uk

 The trust was founded in 1955 by Sir Godfrey Mitchell who endowed it with shares in the Wimpey construction company (making this one of the extraordinary number of major trusts with their origins in the building industry). It funds a range of both capital and revenue needs notably including related building costs, for voluntary and community groups. Grants can be of all sizes, very often to be paid over a period of two or three years. There is no maximum or minimum grant amount.

 W.A. CADBURY TRUST

www.wa-cadbury.org.uk

 The William Adlington Cadbury Charitable Trust funds the Conservation of the environment, including the preservation of listed buildings and monuments, in Birmingham and the West Midlands. It may also fund some social projects based in churches.

 WOLFSON FOUNDATION

www.wolfson.org.uk

 Within a very much broader range of charitable interests the Foundation has a dedicated programme in support of Anglican churches. Eligible churches must be listed (Grade I or Grade II*) and pre-date 1850, and grants are made toward the conservation of the historic fabric.  Specific exclusions include work to bells and organs as well as the provision of heating or other modern facilities, The programme is administered by the Church Buildings Council on behalf of the Foundation and enquiries should be sent directly to the Council at the following address: The Conservation Officer, The Church Buildings Council, Church House, Great Smith Street, London, SW1P 3AZ.

 THE ALAN EVANS MEMORIAL TRUST

The Alan Evans Memorial Trust will consider giving grants to promote the permanent preservation for the benefit of the nation of lands and tenements (including buildings) of beauty or historic interest and as regards land, the preservation (so far as practicable) of the natural features and animal and plant life. It does not give grants for the installation of modern facilities. The Alan Evans Memorial Trust, c/o Coutts & Co Trustee Dept., 440 Strand, London, WC2R 0QS. Tel. 020 7753 1000.

 THE BISHOP RADFORD TRUST

The trust was set up in 2006 to help “promote the work of the Christian church in a manner consistent with the doctrines and principles of the Church of England”. It will fund church -building related projects including renovation/construction/maintenance. Contact: The Secretary, Devonshire House, 1 Devonshire St, London, W1 5DR.

THE FISHERBECK CHARITABLE TRUST

This trust was registered with the Charity Commission in December 2004, and it is the vehicle for the charitable activities of the Cheal family, owners of Roffey Homes developers. "The charity's objects are to encourage charitable giving from the extended Cheal family and to apply these funds to the making of grants for the charitable objects including ""the advancement of the Christian religion" and "to encourage conservation of the environment and the preservation of our heritage". Contact: ian@roffeyhomes.com tel. 01903 241027.

 THE G.C. GIBSON TRUST

The G C GIBSON Trust makes grants in a number of categories, one of which is "Religion". Under this heading, the Trust will consider giving grants for the preservation of religious buildings of historic or architectural interest. Karen Griffin, G C Gibson Trust c/o Deloitte & Touche, Blenheim House, Fitzalan Court, Newport Road, Cardiff, CF24 0TS. Tel. 029 2048 1111.

 THE HOLBECK TRUST

The trust was established by a gift from G C Horsfield, The objects of the trust include: the advancement of the Christian religion and the preservation of buildings or sites of historic or architectural importance. Contact the Trustees: c /o Rollits, Rowntree Wharf, Navigation Road, York, YO1 9WE.

 THE IDLEWILD TRUST

The Idlewild Trust is a grant making trust that supports registered charities concerned with the advancement of education, the encouragement of the performing and fine arts and the preservation for the benefit of the public of lands, buildings andother objects of beauty or historic interest in the United Kingdom.

Rachel Oglethorpe, Trusts Manager, The Idlewild Trust, 1a Taylors Yard, 67 Alderbrook Road, London, SW12 8AD. Tel. 020 8772 3155 (Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday only).

 THE OWEN FAMILY TRUST

The Owen Family Trust; grants are available for the preservation of Christian and secular historic buildings in West Midlands and North Wales. David Owen, The Owen Family Trust, Mill Dam House, Mill Lane, Aldridge, Walsall, WS9 0NB. Tel. 0121 353 1221.

 THE VENEZIANA FUND

The Veneziana Fund receives funds from the sale of the Pizza Veneziana at restaurants belonging to the Pizza Express Group. Created in response to the disastrous flooding in Venice in November 1966, the fund was created by a small supplement on the price of each Pizza Veneziana sold. The monies raised were sent to The Venice in Peril Fund. Now the supplement is distributed to the Veneziana Fund which gives 50% of its net receipts to The Venice in Peril Fund, the other 50% being available within the UK for grants for the preservation, restoration, repair andmaintenance of:

 buildings originally constructed before 1750;

 the fixtures and fittings of such buildings constructed/fitted before1750;and/or

 works of art made before 1750 (including the purchase of such items).

The Trustees do not consider appeals until at least two thirds of the sum required has been raised from other sources. The Trust Administrator, The Veneziana Fund, White Horse Court, 25C North Street, Bishop's Stortford, Herts. CM23 2LD.

 

FUNDING FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF CHURCH BUILDINGS

 

www.allchurches.co.uk 

 The object of the Trust is to promote the Christian religion. The majority of the Trust’s donations are used to support the dioceses and cathedrals of the Church of England. But the Trust has a general fund which responds to requests for financial assistance from Anglican churches, churches of other denominations and the Christian community. It supports appeals from churches for building and restoration projects, repair of church fabric, church community initiatives, religious charities, charities preserving the UK heritage and other charitable causes. Grants are made out of income derived from the Ecclesiastical Insurance Office plc.

 www.nationalchurchestrust.org

 The Trust offers a number of grants from £5,000 to £25,000 available towards installing facilities such as toilets and catering facilities to benefit your place of worship and local community; heating and lighting projects will not qualify.

 www.ahfund.org.uk

 The Architectural Heritage Fund promotes the conservation of historic buildings in the UK by providing feasibility grants and low interest working capital loans for projects undertaken by building preservation trusts and other charities. However, although any charity with a qualifying project is entitled to apply for an options appraisal grant, or a loan, the AHF’s other grants are reserved for buildings preservation trust– charities established specifically to preserve historic buildings.  Financial assistance is available only for buildings that are listed, scheduled or in a conservation area and of acknowledged historic merit. Projects must involve a change either in the ownership of a property or in its use.

 www.awardsforall.org.uk

Part of the Big Lottery Fund, Awards for All England is a simple small grants scheme making awards of between £300 and £10,000. It aims to help improve local communities and the lives of people most in need. It funds projects that meet one or more of the following outcomes:

 People have better chances in life - with better access to training and development to improve their life skills.

 Stronger communities - with more active citizens working together to tackle their problems.

 Improved rural and urban environments - which communities are better able to access and enjoy.

 Healthier and more active people and communities.

It is best to consider this fund for equipment to support community use, unless you have a standalone element of a project that comes to less the £10k. 

 www.churchandcommunityfund.org.uk

The Church and Community Fund (CCF) encourages the church to engage with the local community by funding effective and innovative community outreach projects. It awards grants to community projects run by local Anglican Churches in England that better equip the church to connect with their neighbourhood and beyond. Types of projects supported included the salary costs for youth, children’s and community workers, the running costs for homeless centres, conversion of church buildings to enable use by the wider community,

funding towards street outreach and many more socially engaging initiatives. Interested parishes have to complete an post code checker to see if they are eligible.

 www.cuf.org.uk

Church Urban Fund is a Christian organisation supporting faith-based social action in the England’s poorest communities. We work with local organisations, developing local solutions to tackle the effects of poverty in order to bring about real transformation and relief. The fund describes itself as a “risk-taking ‘first funder’. Providing key financial support to help grassroots, community-based projects get started, we take a flexible, non-bureaucratic approach”

 www.esmeefairbairn.org.uk 

 One of the largest independent grant-making foundations in the UK, the Esmee Fairbairn Trust has a wide range of interests and is particularly supportive of heritage and the arts, community development, education and environmental causes. 

 www.garfieldweston.org

The Garfield Weston Foundation is one of the largest charitable institutions in the country. It gives help to small local communities and major national organisations; it is prepared to consider applications covering a wide range of charitable activity. Recent funding has supported projects in the following categories: Arts, Community, Education, Welfare, Medical, Religion, Youth and Environment. It has been a generous friend to churches.

 www.hlf.org.uk

The Heritage Lottery Fund runs a number of grant streams of relevance to churches:

 

Name of grant

Sharing Heritage

Our Heritage

Young Roots

Heritage Grants

Grants for Places of Worship

How much can I apply for?

£3,000 - £10,000

£10,000 - £100,000

£3,000 - £50,000

£100,000 or more

£10,000 - £250,000

How long does assessment take?

8 weeks

8 weeks

10 weeks

Two-round process, each round is three months

Two-round process

Is any match funding required?

There is no fixed match-funding; applicants should supply what they can, either in cash or in-kind.

There is no fixed match-funding; applicants should supply what they can, either in cash or in-kind.

There is no fixed match-funding; applicants should supply what they can, either in cash or in-kind.

Yes, at least 5% for projects up to £1million and at least 10% for projects over £1million. Can be in cash or in kind.

Yes, at least 5%, either cash or in-kind.

When can I apply?

Now! This is a rolling programme which means you can apply at any time.

Now! This is a rolling programme which means you can apply at any time.

Now! This is a rolling programme which means you can apply at anytime.

Now! There are quarterly deadlines on the HLF website. The application forms are changing; see the HLF website for more detail.

Now! There are 4 deadlines per year, open to any listed place of worship.

What sort of projects can be funded?

Restoring bells, paintings, clocks and organs and helping people to learn about heritage eg: interpretation boards, special events, digitising archives, setting up a church trail etc.

Restoring bells, paintings, clocks and organs and helping people to learn about heritage eg: interpretation boards, special events, digitising archives, setting up a church trail etc.

Helping young people (aged 11-25) engage with heritage including archaeology, making short films, oral history work. This should be in-partnership with a heritage organisation and a youth organisation.

Church restoration, interpretation and access. Finding new uses for historic churches.

Focusing on urgent structural repair. Projects must also show how they will engage with the wider community. Up to 15% of project costs can be toward new facilities.

 

 

 

OUTCOMES

We will focus on the difference a project will make for heritage, people and communities.

We have identified outcomes that we want to achieve with our funding, and have weighted

those that we value the most.
Applicants do not have to deliver all of our outcomes. Whilst some projects may deliver a small

amount towards a large number of outcomes, others may deliver a large amount towards a smaller

selection. We will continue to take account of heritage value, need or opportunity, and risks in our

assessment, and overall value for money.

 

Heritage outcomes
With our investment, heritage will be:

  • better managed (weighted for grants over £100,000);
  • in better condition (weighted for grants over £100,000);
  • better interpreted and explained;
  • identified/recorded.

Outcomes for people
With our investment, people will have:

  • learnt about heritage (weighted for all grants);
  • developed skills (weighted for grants over £100,000)
  • changed their attitudes and/or behaviour;
  • had an enjoyable experience;
  • volunteered time.

Outcomes for communities
With our investment:

  • environmental impacts will be reduced (weighted for grants over £100,000);
  • more people, and a wider range of people will have engaged with heritage (w over £100K)
  • organisations will be more resilient;
  • local economies will be boosted;
  • local areas/communities will be a better place to live, work or visit.

Minimum requirements
We will have proportionate expectations for different levels of grant. Our minimum requirements will be:

Grant award of  £3,000 - £10,000

One outcome for people

Grant award of £10,000 - £100,000 

One outcome for people
One outcome for heritage

Grant award of £100,000 - £2m

One outcome for heritage
One outcome for people
One outcome for communities

Grant award of £2m+ 

More than one outcome for heritage
More than one outcome for people
More than one outcome for communities

 

 

Grants for Places of Worship

Deadlines – for Decision

  • 31 May for September Committee decision
  • 22 August for December Committee decision
  • 29 November for March 2014 Committee decision

For more information and how to access the application look on our website:

http://www.hlf.org.uk/HowToApply/programmes/Pages/Grants_Places_Worship_England.aspx

www.entrust.co.uk

 

Under the Landfill Communities Fund the Government allows landfill site operators to contribute a

percentage of the Landfill Tax they collect to Environmental Bodies to enable them to grant-aid projects

that meet one or more of the Scheme's objectives or to grant-aid other not-for-profit organisations that

wish to do so.

 

 

http://www.tudortrust.org.uk

The trust was founded in 1955 by Sir Godfrey Mitchell who endowed it with shares in the

Wimpey construction company (making this one of the extraordinary number of major trusts

with their origins in the building industry). It funds a range of both capital and revenue needs

notably including related building costs, for voluntary and community groups. Grants can be of all

sizes, very often to be paid over a period of two or three years. There is no maximum or

minimum grant amount. 

 

The Bishop Radford Trust The trust was set up in 2006 to help “promote the work

of the Christian church in a manner consistent with the doctrines and principles of the

Church of England”. It will fund church -building related projects including

renovation/construction/maintenance. Contact: The Secretary, Devonshire House, 1

Devonshire St, London, W1 5DR.

 

 

The George Henry Collins Trust is available to organisations active within a 50 mile

radius of Birmingham. The scheme aims to fund projects with general charitable

purposes. Eligible organisations must be registered UK charities. The application

process is ongoing and interested applicant may apply at any time. Contact the

George Henry Collins Charity for further information: D L Turfrey Secretary, George

Henry Collins Charity,

c/o Martineau Johnson, No.1 Colmore Square, Birmingham, West Midlands, B4 6AA.

Tel: 0870 763 2000

 

Funding for Community/Social Projects (that may take place in church

buildings)

 

www.barondavenportscharity.org

 

The Charity’s area of benefit is the City of

Birmingham and West Midland counties not extending 60 miles (or 96.56 kilometres)

from Birmingham Town Hall.

The Charity awards grants in three categories (see below) but states on its website

that churches doing work specifically with young people may apply.

 Alms-houses, hospices and residential homes for older people.

 Organisations for the benefit of children/young people.

 Individual widows, spinsters, divorced ladies, single mothers and fatherless

children, who meet certain criteria set-out by the Charity.

 

 

www.lloydstsbfoundations.org.uk

If you are undertaking community focused projects

to alleviate social disadvantage, you may be able to access Lloyds TSB foundation

funding. The foundation exists to fund local, regional and national charities working to

tackle disadvantage across England and Wales. It doesn’t fund capital works appeals

but does fund church projects providing they meet the criteria for the Community

Programme. Please note that the foundation only funds registered charities i.e.:

charities that are individually registered with the Charity Commission. It does not

accept applications from ‘exempt’ charities such as PCCs, so only apply if you re one of those

parishes who have registered with the Charity Commission and have a charity number.

 

www.ranktrust.org

This trust was established in 2002 for the advancement of the Christian faith and represents an

amalgamation of a number of charities established by the late Joseph Rank, or members of his

family, during the period from 1918 to April 1942. The original trusts represented a practical expression

of the strong Christian beliefs of their founder and his desire to advance the Christian faith and to help

the less fortunate members of society. The trust's three main areas of interest are: the adaptation of

Methodist Church properties with a view to providing improved facilities for use both by the church itself

and in its work in the community in which it is based, work with young people and

projects that demonstrate a Christian approach to the practical, educational and

spiritual needs of people. Contact: secretary@ranktrust.org

 

www.wa-cadbury.org.uk

The William Adlington Cadbury Charitable Trust funds the

Conservation of the environment, including the preservation of listed buildings and

monuments, in Birmingham and the West Midlands. It may also fund some social

projects based in churches.

 

www.whsmithplc.co.uk/corporate_responsibility/whsmith_trust

 

The W H Smith Trust is a registered charity (registered charity no. 1013782) with two principal objectives:

 To support the local communities in which W H Smith staff and customers live

and work and;

 To support education and lifelong learning, helping people of any age to

achieve their educational potential.

 

 

Funding for specific items:

Art Work (new commissions)

www.churchart.co.uk/commissioning/cottam_will_trust.php

If you are thinking of

commissioning new artwork for your church, the Cottam Will Trust for the

Embellishment of Ancient Gothic Churches may be able to provide some funding. It

is administered by The Executive Committee of the Friends of Friendless Churches

and exists to enable “the purchase for the advancement of religion of objects of

beauty to be placed in ancient Gothic churches either in England or Wales”.

Whilst its income in an average year only slightly exceeds 10,000 and grants are

therefore unlikely to be more than a few thousand pounds each, the Trustees would

like the Trust to be used more widely and have adopted a catholic definition of

"objects of beauty". Although they feel obliged to exclude a monument or memorial to

an individual, previous items funded have included: bells, paschal candlesticks,

vestments, hymn boards, stained glass and statuary. Trustees cannot accept

applications from churches that lack medieval Gothic fabric.

 

 

Bells

 

The Barron Bell Trust makes small grants towards the provision, installation,

inspection, repair and maintenance of carillons of bells in “low church parishes” only.

(It states that ‘high church parishes’ should not apply). Applicants should have raised

in the region of 50% of the total cost of the project prior to making an application.

Ian H Walrond, Trustee, The Barron Bell Trust, c/o 71 Lower Green Road, Pembury,

Tunbridge Wells, Kent, TN2 4EB.

 

The Sharpe Trust The late Frederick Sharpe, FSA, was one of the world’s leading

authorities on the history, technology, and music of bells. For many years he was a

consultant expert on the subject and inspected many hundreds of towers and

belfries. He died in February 1976 and in his will provided a sum of money and

nominated a group of Trustees (the "Sharpe Trustees") to hold and use the capital

and income "in their sole discretion” for the maintenance, repair, and restoration of

Church Bells situate anywhere in England and Wales. Grants range between 50

and 500, the average being approximately 150. www.sharpetrustees.org.uk

 

The Manifold Trust is very keen to help churches bring into use again bells which

have not been rung for many years, and to augment existing peals of fewer than six

bells. Applications for grants for this purpose should be made direct to Ian Oram, The

Cottage, School Hill, Warnham, Horsham, Sussex RH12 3NQ, who acts for the Bells

Restoration Funds Committee of the Central Council of Church Bellringers and

advises the Trust on these matters. The Trust does not make grants to churches for

building repairs as it makes a block grant to the Historic Churches Preservation Trust

for this purpose.

The Keltek Trust helps churches acquire surplus and/or redundant bells to be hung

for English style full-circle bell-ringing: www.btinternet.com/~keltek

 

Church Furniture

 

The Leche Trust has the power to make grants for any object or purpose which is

recognised as charitable. At present, it is the trustees' policy to concentrate their

work in five areas, one of which is "the preservation of buildings and their contents

and the repair and conservation of church furniture (including such items as

monuments, but excluding structural repairs to the church fabric). Preference is given

to buildings and objects of the Georgian period.

 

Church Interiors

 

www.sal.org.uk/grants/williamandjanemorris

The William and Jane Morris Fund is

one of a number of individual funds administered by the Society of Antiquaries. The

purpose of the fund is the protection of ancient buildings, with the stipulation that

grants should be made only to works that are carried out in accordance with the

principles of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB). In practice

the income from the fund has been devoted almost entirely towards making grants

towards the repair of church fittings. Preference is given to the conservation of

decorative features, for example, stained-glass windows, sculpture, furniture, textiles,

monuments and tombs. Structural repairs and fabric are considered only under

exceptional circumstances, for instance when in association with the conservation of

a work of art. Repairs to bells or organs, alteration or decoration of buildings,

electrical rewiring and the repair or installation of central heating systems are not

funded. Only buildings or monuments erected before 1896, the date of William

Morris’s death are eligible.

 

Clocks

The Church Buildings Council gives grants for the repair of church clocks:

• All mechanical clocks are eligible.

• The project must involve overhaul and repair of the movement and/or dial

motionwork.

• Repair and redecoration of the dial itself is only considered when the dial is ancient

and of historical interest and the treatment is conservation-based.

www.churchcare.co.uk Tel: 020 7898 1874, Email: enquiries.ccb@c-of-e.org.uk

If your clock is Georgian you might try: The Leche Trust, www.lechetrust.org Tel:

020 8870 6233, Email: info@lechetrust.org

The Worshipful Company of Clockmakers may be useful source of general help and

advice: www.clockmakers.org Tel: 020 7638 5500, Email: clockmakersco@aol.com

 

Glass

www.worshipfulglaziers.com The Worshipful Company of Glaziers and Painters of

Glass (often known as the Glaziers' Company) is one of the historic Livery

Companies of the City of London it makes grants available to churches and other

public buildings exclusively for the restoration and conservation of historic and

important stained glass. Grants are awarded by The Glaziers Trust, a registered

charity which has two principal objects:

 The restoration and conservation of historic and important stained glass

 Promoting the craft by supporting the education and training of craftsmen and

women in the fields of stained and painted glass and by fostering public

information and awareness.

 

Historic Ironwork

www.ironhall.co.uk

The Ironmongers' Company, as part of its charitable activities,

works to promote the craft of ironwork. Support is given primarily for the conservation

of historic ironwork or the creation of new decorative iron or steel work. Grants are

made for charitable purposes and not for the benefit of private individuals.

Applications are accepted from registered charities, churches and schools for

projects in the UK only. The Company prefers to fund entire projects, or specific

elements of a project. The majority of grants awarded are under 5,000. Grants are

paid on completion of the project and must be claimed within two years of the date

awarded.

 

Organs

 

The Arts Council Arts Lottery Fund. Organ appeals in connection with concert and

other performances should approach the Arts Lottery Fund. The Heritage Lottery

11

Fund Your Heritage scheme may be appropriate for major works to historic

instruments.

 

The O N Organ Fund. The fund offers grants for the provision and restoration of pipe

organs in the British Isles. Grant applications are welcomed before the closing dates

of 31 March and 30 September.

The Secretary

Dr Alan Thurlow

8 Old Bakery Gardens

Chichester

West Sussex

PO19 8AJ

Email alanjthurlow@btinternet.com

www.onorganfund.org.uk

 

The Ouseley Trust

Martin Williams

127 Coleherne Court

Old Brompton Road

London SW5 0EB

Tel 020 7373 1950

Fax 020 7341 0043

Email clerk@ouseleytrust.org.uk

Funding is available for organ repairs and other musical objects for Anglican

churches where there is an active choral tradition.

 

War Memorials

Since 2003 the Wolfson Foundation has funded a joint programme with English

Heritage and the War Memorials Trust, providing grants for the conservation of war

memorials. The programme is administered by the War Memorials Trust. The

scheme relates only to existing war memorials and no grant can be offered to support

the creation of new war memorials or projects for which work has already started

and/or is completed. Graves of any type are not eligible for support under any of War

Memorials Trust grant schemes. www.warmemorials.org

 

Funding directories:

www.dsc.org.uk and www.trustfunding.org.uk Both of these sites are run by The

Directory of Social Change and you need to be a subscriber to use them. However,

the Diocese is a subscriber and they can be consulted at St Mary’s House (please

ring for details, 01543 - 306030.)

www.ffhb.org.uk The Funds for Historic Buildings website is a comprehensive guide

to funding for anyone seeking to repair, restore or convert for a new use any historic

building in the United Kingdom (excluding the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man)

which is listed, scheduled or in a conservation area and of acknowledged historic

merit. It includes details of virtually all substantive funding sources which specialise in

historic buildings, as well as many (including a variety of regeneration programmes)

which provide funding for historic building projects within a wider remit.

www.funderfinder.org.uk FunderFinder is a small UK charity which specialises in

information and advice about charitable trusts and foundations that fund in the UK.

Some of the things it produces are free, some cost although you may be able to

these for free at a library.

www.fundingcentral.org.uk Funding Central is a free website for charities, voluntary

organisations and social enterprises. The site provides access to thousands of

funding and finance opportunities, plus a wealth of tools and resources supporting

organisations to develop sustainable income strategies appropriate to their needs.

 

 

 

 

General sources of information and guidance

 

Crossing the Threshold Toolkit – A community development approach to the use of

church buildings. This toolkit has been produced here in Hereford Diocese and is nationally

recognised as good practice.  It is a step by step guide to the development of your church building

as a community space, covering things like proving a case, meeting community need,

community consultation. 

It is available on the web site under the community partnership pages.

www.hereford.anglican.org

 

The Parish Resources for Stewardship website contains resources and advice for

parish treasurers, project treasurers, Gift Aid secretaries and all those who have a

concern for making sure the church has a firm financial base for carrying out its

mission and ministry. It includes advice on fundraising, Gift Aid, setting up a Friends

scheme and parish giving.

 

www.spabfim.org.uk

 Run by the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings

(SPAB) Faith in Maintenance is a new initiative which aims to help volunteers who

look after historic places of worship. It does not provide funding but training to help

you understand how your building works and how to solve problems caused by leaky

gutters and blocked drains. Its training courses are free and are available to any

volunteer who helps to look after an historic place of worship. It also has useful

information on finding funding under its advice and guidance section.

www.neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk This website allows you to find detailed

statistics within specific geographic areas. This may be of use in researching the

needs of your local community and also in backing up statements made in funding

applications.

 

www.shrinkingthefootprint.org

The Church of England’s national environmental

campaign on energy efficient and other green issues.

 

www.nacvs.org.uk

National Association of Councils for the Voluntary Sector. NB

Your local Voluntary Action Council can supply a list of local charitable trusts.